Mass. baby owls poisoned by pesticides that kill rodents – Henry Club

Three Massachusetts baby owls were recovering after being poisoned by rodenticides, a wildlife rehabilitator says. Linda Amato, a wildlife rehabilitator, said the mother of the owlets died from ingesting rodenticide, commonly used to kill rodents, but a poison that too often works its way up the food chain. die, but they die,” Amato said. ” And you have animals that eat these poisoned rodents.” In this case, the mom also fed it to at least one of her outlets, which fell from the nest. Those caring for the owlets gave the bird vitamin K injections to stop its bleeding, and it is now stable.”Right now, we have it in rehab,” Amato says. The baby great horned owl is being rehabilitated with the help of Cape Ann Wildlife Inc. “Very little sleep, trying to stop all this bleeding and damage so that they can live.”The other two outlets are doing well, but will need a lot of care. Wildlife advocates have been pushing for legislation to better control rodenticides. In the meantime, they encourage everyone to explore safer options for pest control.

Three Massachusetts baby owls were recovering after being poisoned by rodenticides, a wildlife rehabilitator says.

Linda Amato, a wildlife rehabilitator, said the mother of the owlets died from ingesting rodenticide, commonly used to kill rodents, but a poison that too often works its way up the food chain.

“The rodents will eat it and the rat or mouse will die, but they die,” Amato said. ” And you have animals that eat these poisoned rodents.”

In this case, the mom also fed it to at least one of her outlets, which fell from the nest. Those caring for the owlets gave the bird vitamin K injections to stop its bleeding, and it is now stable.

“Right now, we have it in rehab,” Amato says.

The baby great horned owl is being rehabilitated with the help of Cape Ann Wildlife Inc. “Very little sleep, trying to stop all this bleeding and damage so that they can live.”

The other two outlets are doing well, but will need a lot of care.

Wildlife advocates have been pushing for legislation to better control rodenticides. In the meantime, they encourage everyone to explore safer options for pest control.